Beautiful Japanese Terms

I feel so inspired whenever I come across terms that are new to me, and I love spending time and doing research on these newfound topics. I came across a bunch of beautiful Japanese terms, but the one I will be sharing in this post stood out the most for me.

Kintsugi: The art of precious scars

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Scrolling through Pinterest I came across this Japanese term, Kintsugi, and felt the need to blog about it as it conveys my blog’s main message so beautifully (embrace the glorious mess that you are.) Kintsugi is built on the idea that in embracing flaws and imperfections, you can create an even stronger, more beautiful piece of art.

The philosophy behind kintsugi is to value an object’s beauty, as well as its imperfections, focusing on them equally as something to celebrate, not disguise.

From Broken To Beautiful: The Power of Kintsugi – Concrete Unicorn

I feel we have much to learn from this simple act of repairing a cracked pot with gold.

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I want you to see the cracks in two slightly different ways:

1. As pain and suffering you went through

You see, we are just like these broken and repaired pots. How these objects cracked and broke, we too crack and break sometimes, yet I am sure you’ve noticed you came out stronger because of the pain and suffering. These pots too were made stronger; being repaired, but unlike most of us who much rather hide what we’ve been through, these pots are repaired with gold, highlighting the brokenness and flaws.

We shouldn’t hide the pain or be ashamed of the journey we went through, but celebrate it and even be proud of it, for it helped shape the person we have become today. I believe we have gone through whatever we did, for a reason, even when the reason may be unclear.

Once we overcome our obstacles, and once the pain lessens, our ‘cracks get filled with gold’. The pain we went through is binding ourselves stronger together and making us ‘more beautiful’, stronger, better, and wiser.

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2. As flaws and mistakes

This brokenness of the pots is seen as flaws, just as we have many flaws of our own. I could write a book full of all my flaws and the mistakes I’ve made.

Our flaws are what makes us unique, it adds to our personality and the way we go through life. I personally love and accept most of my flaws, yet I always try to improve them, I try to fix them with ‘gold’.

Our mistakes are what make us wiser and better prepared for the future. Our mistakes can be seen as our lessons in life, our greatest and fastest teacher.

Without growth or improvement, we will stay like broken pots and be thrown into the trash after some time, instead of being repaired with gold and becoming more beautiful. We should strive for growth and improvement.

You should see the growth and improvement on your flaws and past mistakes as the gold which enhances and adds value to who you are.


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Remember: Embrace the glorious mess that you are

Hope you enjoyed the post, there will be more posts on Japenese culture to come👣

Feel free to share your thoughts related and unrelated, I always enjoy listening to what you have to say and seeing things from someone else’s perspective.

I can’t thank you enough for reading and supporting my blog

May your life be filled with much love and abundance

Enjoy this blessed day

👣❤

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16 Comments

  1. akin to the mirror reflecting a beautiful woman
    she thinks she’s perfect
    the mirror reflects her perfection and imperfection
    she sees what she wants to see
    the mirror says,
    “you are only looking not seeing”

    Liked by 1 person

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